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Memories of Rio

Nikon F3 + Nikon 24mm f2.8 Ai + Fuji Provia (Rio de Janiero, 2012)

In 2012 I took  a vacation to Rio with my F3 loaded with Fuji Provia and a FM with Ektar. By this point I was fully enamored with shooting film, so much so that I decided to exclusively take film cameras on this trip (my first time doing so). I was also very much enjoying using these two manual focus Ai Nikon Bodies and took a lens selection of the 24mm f2.8 (non-ai version Ai’d), 35mm f2.8 Ai and a 50mm f1.8 Series E. I find this to be a decent travel set-up (so much so I took almost the same gear on my 2017 trip to Utah save for the 24mm which I decided to swap out for a 20mm), although the bodies are made out of metal, the lenses are so small and relatively light, that overall its less weight then I’d have normally taken with digital gear.

I must admit I felt a little uneasy about not taking my DSLR (which was a D90 at the time). What if the X-Rays fogged my film? What if I didn’t nail the shot and didn’t realise until later? These fears proved to be misguided (the film went through 6 X-Ray scanners to no visible detriment) and my decision was also helped by the fact that the year before when traveling with a friend in Belize we had a load of camera gear  stolen. He had all of his digital gear taken, whereas I lucked out, in the sense that they only went in the top of my bag and stole my F100 and another 50mm Series E lens.  If they’d have rummaged further they’d have found my D90 and lenses. I figured taking older film cameras would make them less desirable to steal and make me stand out a bit less.

One thing I completely misjudged was how much film I should take. I can’t remember exactly how many rolls I’d bought, but put it this way, now in 2017 I still have rolls left from this trip sitting in my freezer. This error I guess was all part of the transition to shooting film. The limitations of the number of shots per roll has made me have a higher value on each shutter press. So naturally I take less photos. But hopefully a better percentage of good ones. I estimated the quantity of film needed based on the digital shots I’d taken on a similar trip which proved a schoolboy error.

As for the photos, looking back on them I enjoy them greatly. The fantastic sunlight of Rio brought out the best of the Ektar, especially around sunset. I love the gradient of how the highlights are blown out as the sun is setting on the mountains of Rio in two of the pictures below. I find this behaviour much more pleasing than digital. As for the Provia – well I’ve had pretty inconsistent results with slide film in general, really down to me not exposing it well (see last picture in the below series). I took it on this trip as a bit of a trial, and to be honest my only regret is not choosing to take some black and white film instead.

Nikon FM + Nikon 35mm f2.8 Ai + Kodak Ektar (Rio De Janiero, 2012)

Nikon F3 + Fuji Provia (Isla Grande, 2012)

Nikon F3 + Nikon 24mm f2.8 Ai + Fuji Provia (Rio De Janiero, 2012)

Nikon F3 + Nikon 35mm f2.8 Ai + Fuji Provia (Rio De Janiero, 2012)

Nikon F3 + Nikon 50mm f1.8 Series E + Fuji Provia (Rio De Janiero, 2012)

Yosemite National Park

I recently purchased Ansel Adams: In the National Parks and its a thoroughly inspirational and enjoyable book. I’ve also been reading up again on the zone exposure system he devised for B&W photography with the aim of improving my exposures for my next trip somewhere wild. For now I have revisited the series of images I captured on my Bronica SQA with Kodak TMax 400 film during my 2013 trip to Yosemite. Its an incredible landscape and the Bronica was a joy to use in capturing it. 

Bronica SQ + Zenzanon 80mm f2.8 + Kodak TMax 400 (Yosemite CA, 2013)

Bronica SQ + Zenzanon 80mm f2.8 + Kodak TMax 400 (Yosemite CA, 2013)

Bronica SQ + Zenzanon 50mm f3.5 + Kodak TMax 400 (Yosemite CA, 2013)

Bronica SQ + Zenzanon 80mm f2.8 + Kodak TMax 400 (Yosemite CA, 2013)

Bronica SQ + Zenzanon 50mm f3.5 + Kodak TMax 400 (Yosemite CA, 2013)

Bronica SQ + Zenzanon 50mm f3.5 + Kodak TMax 400 (Yosemite CA, 2013)

Bronica SQ + Zenzanon 150mm f4 + Kodak TMax 400 (Yosemite CA, 2013)

 

Nikon FM with Portra and Ektar in Utah’s National Parks

Trip Report

I’d wanted to visit the national parks in Utah again ever since I’d been to Monument Valley in 2013; I’d initially set my sights on going to all of Zion, Bryce Canyon, Arches and Canyonlands for this trip. However I soon realised the week I’d organised the trip was memorial day weekend (a bit of an error) – so there were tons of people in each of the parks and also lines to get in. This also made the logistics of the trip quite hard, as all of the campsites were fully booked. So this meant we ended up staying at near St George UT and driving to the parks each day.

In an effort to beat the crowds, the first afternoon we visited Bryce. They’ve got an convenient shuttle service so you can park easily outside the park and take the shuttle to all of the main sites. We got off at Bryce Point (the first bus stop after the visitor centre) and walked along the rim to sunset point. Then we took the hike down through the hoodoos which was pretty epic – the scale of these eroded monoliths is best appreciated hiking around them.

Nikon FM + Nikon 50mm Series E f1.8 + Kodak Portra 160 (Bryce Canyon UT, 2017)

Then we drove to near Capital Reef national park and secured a campsite there to break up the drive to Arches. It was not really a fun drive, along winding roads in the pitch black, with deer jumping out in front of the car. The next day, with a significant drive to Arches still ahead of us, we powered on and didn’t stop in Capital Reef. The scenery from the car was still fantastic.

Nikon FM + Nikon 35mm f2.8 Ai + Kodak Portra 160 (Arches UT, 2017)

Nikon FM + Nikon 50mm Series E f1.8 + Kodak Portra 160 (Arches UT, 2017)

We arrived to Arches to a queue of cars waiting at the entrance. This was at maybe 10.30am on the Sunday of Memorial day and it took maybe 45 minutes to finally get through the date. Once inside we headed straight for the hike to delicate arch, as we figured this would be busy already and only more so as the day progressed. The road into the park is stunning, to be honest photos don’t do this place justice – the shapes and scale of these eroded rocks is phenomenal. I had to stop for a few snapshots along the way. 

Nikon FM + Nikon 20mm f4 Ai + Kodak Portra 160 (Arches UT, 2017)

Nikon FM + Nikon 50mm f1.8 Ai + Kodak Ektar (Delicate Arch UT, 2017)

There is a short easy 3 mile hike from the bursting full car park to the arch itself It seems so improbable that rock would erode like this, so its easy to see why this is such an icon. An icon that everyone wants their picture taken under, perhaps unsurprisingly, and there was indeed a massive disneyland style line of people waiting to have theirs taken. Its great that the national parks are accessible for people to enjoy, however the next time I visit here I’ll definitely plan it for the off season. I managed to get a few snapshots of the arch (with the poor lighting) finally without anyone underneath. We stayed for a while longer in the park itself but finally the mid afternoon heat got the better of us and we decided to get on with the 5 or so hour drive back to Ivins, leaving Canyonlands next door for a future trip.

Nikon FM + Nikon 35mm f2.8 Ai + Kodak Portra 160 (Snow Canyon UT, 2017)

Nikon FM + Nikon 20mm f4 Ai + Kodek Ektar (Snow Canyon UT, 2017)

Nikon FM + 200mm f4 Ai + Kodak Ektar (Snow Canyon, UT)

So Snow Canyon State Park seems to be an absolute undiscovered jewel of Utah. Its right by the town of Ivins and on the Monday of Memorial Day weekend there was barely anyone there. The scenery is sublime, with petrified sand dunes, lava flow rocks and lots of great trails. Its easy to see why they shot Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid here. Theres just one road through it so its easy to see in a day, but we spaced out a couple of visits to the middle and north side of the park over two mornings.

Nikon FM + Nikon 35mm f2.8 Ai + Kodak Ektar (Zion UT, 2017)

Finally, we visited Zion National Park on the Tuesday after memorial day, hoping the park would at least be a bit quieter than the weekend. Perhaps it was, but we arrived around 7am and already the visitor center car park was already pretty full and there was a big line for the shuttle busses. The Angel’s Landing hike was my most anticipated of the trip. It did not disappoint – its a pretty strenuous 5 mile round trip hike with a narrow trail with steep drop offs at times. There was already a good number of people who were coming down the mountain by the time we got near the top, and many sections are essentially one-way for any given time, so there was plenty of waiting for people to pass. The view from the top was spectacular. After descending we stopped at a few other spots in the park, and drove around the other side before heading back. I view this trip more as a photography scouting mission, as I aim to return again to get a few more shots. Things to work on next time is definitely metering – as you can see from below. I realised there was a fault with the meter on the FM quite late on into the trip, leading me to overexpose quite a few shots from where I’d wanted to be. 

Nikon FM + Nikon 20mm f4 Ai + Kodak Ektar (Zion UT, 2017)

Gear Notes

After getting back into film photography after a couple of years not really shooting any rolls, I did not hesitate to decide to exclusively take analog cameras. However deciding which gear to take was pretty tough. I was torn between taking two 35mm Nikon bodies or my 6×6 Bronica SQ. In the end I went for the former due to a lower cost per shot but as I do really enjoy shooting 6×6 I also decided to take my Zeiss Ikon 517 as well. This is such a great travel medium format camera as it is so light and compact. I’m also consistently impressed with the colour rendition and sharpness of the lens.

iPhone 6s (Zion UT, 2017)

Its very easy to take kilograms and kilograms of photo gear on trips like this, but with Nikon Ai lens being so lightweight and compact this set up seemed a good option. I went for a 20mm Ai f4, 35mm Ai f2.8, 50mm Ai Series E f1.8 and a 200mm Ai f4. These all also have 52mm filter threads which is also a boon, as I mainly used a Nikon R62 filter for the black and white photography, so it could be used across all of the lenses. The only lens that I’d reconsider is the 200mm as it didn’t get much use really. I think a shorter telephoto like a 105mm would have been better for compressed landscape shots. The lens itself though is great and light, and if there had been more in the way of wildlife I suppose it could have come in handy. This was also the first time I’d used the 20mm Ai f4 which I was quite excited to see the results from. It was definitely a great focal length to have, but to be honest I was pretty disappointed with the corner sharpness of this lens. Most of the shots were taken at f8 or f11 and focussed to maximise DOF from the scale on the lens. Maybe this was the issue as I have since read that corner sharpness is better when focussed towards infinity, or maybe I have a poor copy of this lens.

I also took the opportunity to buy a lighter travel tripod. An aluminium Giottos tripod has served me well for the last 5 years, but its nearly 3kg with a ballhead attached. I’ve never hiked with it and its always felt like a pain to lug around. So after some research I decided to get a Manfrotto Be Free carbon fibre tripod which only weighs 1.1Kg. To be honest its not a cheap purchase but its built really well and comes with a 10 year warranty. It was no hassle to attach to my camera bag for hiking.

iPhone 6s (Zion UT, 2017)

So this was a fantastic trip and I am happy with the photos that came back, but I see it more of a scouting mission as I hope to return at some point in the future. However next time I think I would choose different B&W film – one I was more familiar with like Delta 100 or TMax 100. I wasn’t blown away but what I got out of SFX. As for the colour film I was surprised how much I liked the muted colours of Portra, as this isn’t a film I’ve used much before. Normally I go straight for the Ektar so it was pretty cool to shoot both on similar landscapes. But the main thing I’d reconsider going back to these places is to camp nearby and visit less places in a similar time. It was hard to get to the parks when the morning light was good (sunrise was around 6:15), and due to the late sunsets (somewhere near 20:45) the same applied as we generally had long drives back to where we were staying. The heat in the midday was also very exhausting. I think September or October could be a good time of year for my next trip there.

 

My first roll of Ilford SFX

iPhone 6s (Arches National Park Utah, 2017)

This B&W film is a near infra-red (i.e. extended red sensitivity towards IR wavelengths) film made by Ilford. I’d wanted to try it out for a while and decided to take a chance on it by taking it on my trip round Utah’s National (Bryce, Arches and Zion) and State (Snow Canyon) parks. I’d been somewhat inspired by the completely black skies in this post and thought I’d be able to get some good detail in the foreground and some silhouetted rocks with a completely black sky when using my Nikon R60 red filter. Reading more after the fact a deeper filter such as an R72 may have been a better choice to achieve this effect.

Nikon F3 + Nikon 20mm f4 + Ilford SFX 200 + Scanned by Bayeux (Bryce Canyon UT, 2017)

Above was one of the first shots from the roll. As you can see the sky is nowhere near the black I’d hoped, but not too big of an issue on this shot as that wasn’t the focus. A few of the ones below are better. Overall the contrast turned out low which is disappointing, but to be fair logistical reasons in getting to the parks (as being memorial day weekend it was hard to camp near the parks) limited the availability of good light (i.e. early morning and evening before sunset). However I still, perhaps naively, hoped for the images to come out better. They seem grainier than I’d expected and the sky was not as dark (though this may be due to the filter and unremarkable-poor light). In addition this roll of film has made me stop and tell myself I should read up once more on the zone system for better B&W exposures.

Nikon F3 + Nikon 35mm f2.8 + Ilford SFX 200 + Scanned by Bayeux (Arches UT, 2017)

Nikon F3 + Nikon 20mm f4 + Ilford SFX 200 + Scanned by Bayeux (Arches UT, 2017)

Nikon F3 + Nikon 35mm f2.8 + Ilford SFX 200 + Scanned by Bayeux (Arches UT, 2017)

Nikon F3 + Nikon 35mm f1.8 + Ilford SFX 200 + Scanned by Bayeux (Arches UT, 2017)

Nikon F3 + Nikon35mm f2.8 + Ilford SFX 200 + Scanned by Bayeux (Snow Canyon UT, 2017)

Nikon F3 + Nikon 35mm f4 + Ilford SFX 200 + Scanned by Bayeux (Snow Canyon UT, 2017)

Nikon F3 + Nikon 35mm f2.8 + Ilford SFX 200 + Scanned by Bayeux (Zion UT, 2017)

Nikon F3 + Nikon 35mm f2.8 + Ilford SFX 200 + Scanned by Bayeux (Zion UT, 2017)

Nikon F3 + Nikon 200mm f4 + Ilford SFX 200 + Scanned by Bayeux (Snow Canyon UT, 2017)

 

Utah National Parks with a Zeiss Ikon 517 and Kodak Ektar

I’ll be writing a full trip report and also sharing some more photos soon. But for now some medium format images from the trusty 6×6 Zeiss Ikon folder.

Hoodoos at Bryce Canyon (Zeiss Ikon Nettar 517 + Kodak Ektar + Scanned by Bayeux Imaging)

Bryce Canyon (Zeiss Ikon Nettar 517 + Kodak Ektar + Scanned by Bayeux Imaging)

Delicate Arch (Zeiss Ikon Nettar 517 + Kodak Ektar + Scanned by Bayeux Imaging)

Rock Formations at Arches National Park (Zeiss Ikon Nettar 517 + Kodak Ektar + Scanned by Bayeux Imaging)

Zion Canyon (Zeiss Ikon Nettar 517 + Kodak Ektar + Scanned by Bayeux Imaging)

Snow Canyon (Zeiss Ikon Nettar 517 + Kodak Ektar + Scanned by Bayeux Imaging)

White Rocks at Snow Canyon (Zeiss Ikon Nettar 517 + Kodak Ektar + Scanned by Bayeux Imaging)

Olympus 35RD Camera Review

This classic Olympus 70s rangefinder is a camera I thought I’d love. After all, it looks stunning, its compact, and on paper has a great fast sharp lens. I’d only ever used SLRs at the point when I bought it and wanted to try a rangefinder with a view that it might get me to try out street photography. Unfortunately it never really lived upto my expectations and despite running quite a few rolls of film through it, I never ended up really enjoying using the camera. 

On paper this camera has some excellent features – a 40mm f1.7 lens and full manual mode (not requiring a battery). To use the meter and auto mode you need a mercury battery which isn’t so bad because you can pick up replacement ‘wien cell’ batteries easily. The downside is that the lens cap is the on/off switch for the meter, and it’ll be wasting power if you leave it without the lens cap on when not in use. I’d always forget and needless to say that meant the batteries didn’t last very long. As for the lens, f1.7 wasn’t really an advantage for me, as the rangefinder patch was pretty dim, and it was a struggle to focus accurately.

I picked this up off eBay winning an auction for something like £35 in 2011. After it fell out of use between the latter half of 2012 and early 2013 oil got on the aperture blades and they got stuck up. So I had to sell it on as spares/repair, which was a shame as I think these go for decent money in working order.

Its funny though that I do still find myself drawn to the Olympus cameras of this era. Maybe I’d have enjoyed the camera more if I’d properly tried street photography and relied more on zone focus. Whilst I wouldn’t buy one of these again, I do find myself tempted to try out the smaller Olympus 35RC.

Zeiss Ikon Ikonta 520/2 – First Impressions


So I’ve had it in my head that I wanted to try out a 6×9 camera for a while now, and given how much I’ve enjoyed the folding Zeiss Ikon Nettar 517, I set my sights on another folder. I almost pulled the trigger on one at the Vanves flea market when visiting Paris during my last visit, but upon inspecting it I couldn’t quite figure out if I was doing something wrong or the focus was jammed. Probably the latter so I left it where it was, and did something illogical a couple of weeks later by taking a risk by buying one on eBay that looked very old and tattered. It was only 11 quid though, so what the hell, buying an processing the film costs more than that.

The unboxing was an unceremonious affair and a quick inspection shows that the glass was clean, the shuttered fired nicely on all speeds and the bellows didn’t have any obvious holes. I will admit though prior to this it had taken me a good 5 minutes to figure out how to open the case, back and bellows. The bellows seemed to sag a bit and they didn’t fold neatly in one place, but I guessed that wouldn’t affect the image.

As far as I can tell the camera is a Ikonta 520/2 model which puts it at somewhere between 1929-1937, so over 80 years old. It has a Telma shutter with B,25,100 speeds and a 110mm Novar lens and can take 8 photos on normal 120 film. I missed the first frame because for some reason the backing on my Kodak Ektar was unclear where to start as it didn’t show a 1. The viewfinder if the little circular mirror arrangement on the top right of the front bellows. I must admit it took me the first 4 pictures with the camera to actually realise what this was. Then it dawned on me and I felt a bit stupid for not realising sooner. I felt even more stupid shortly thereafter when I realised the focus scale was in metres and not feet (like the Nettar 517). It was also apparent that the field of view for this lens was much wider than I’d anticipated. Ah well, thats why one does a test roll. 

I got the photos back from being developed today and scanned them in with my Epson v500. The pictures were snapped away at my parents farm in Shropshire the weekend before last as if the roll was successful I planned to pack it to take with my to Zion National Park this week. Alas it was not to be. On the back of the camera is the red film counter window. On the Nettar this has a built in metal cover that goes over it, but on this camera it has none. I almost put something over it and it seems I should have from the red light leak you can see from the below. The other small light leak in the corner doesn’t bother me too much, so if the red patch can be fixed with a simple bit of tape then that’ll do! However I’ll try that out at home instead of in the national parks.

Zeiss Ikon Ikonta 520/2 + Kodak Ektar + Epson v500 Scanner (Shropshire, 2017)

Zeiss Ikon Ikona 520/2 + Kodak Ektar + Epson v500 Scanner (Shropshire, 2017)

Bronica in the Sky

Bronica SQ + Zenzanon 50mm f3.5 + Kodak Ektar (NYC, 2013)

I took my Bronica along with me when taking a helicopter tour shortly after moving to NYC. It was quite a challenge to frame shots with the movement of the helicopter and the back to front nature of using the waist level finder, so I had to straighten them up in with cropping. I’m also not really sure if I like how the colours scanned in, so I tried to correct the white balance in digitally. Despite this I do really enjoy these photos, particularly the one above. I used to work in one of these buildings so its a pretty nostalgic shot for me.

Glacial Waters

Bronica SQ + 50mm f3.5 + Fuji Velvia 100 (Glacier National Park, USA)

This above is a shot of Iceberg Lake in Glacier National park. Its nearly a 5 mile hike to this spot, but it these crystal clear waters were definitely worth it. I’d debated not bothering to take the Bronica with me and just sticking with my digital Nikon D7100. However stubbornly I took it and put up with the extra weight in my backpack. I find this constantly a tough decision when on hiking trips, as I do really enjoy capturing images like this on medium format, but traveling with a MF body and a couple of lenses along with a DSLR (+ lenses) does sometimes feel like overkill. For my next trip (which is to Zion National Park) I’m going to take one of my Zeiss Ikon folding cameras instead to save on weight. Maybe I should go the opposite way, and just take the Bronica instead!

This was the first roll of medium format slide film I’d used. To be honest I think I would’ve been better off using Ektar instead for its latitude, as I clearly didn’t nail the exposures as well as Velvia would like (an getting a bit of a purple tint that I’ve tried to edit out digitally). That being said I think the way it captures the crystal clear water in the photo above is great and to be honest the time of day these were all shot (mid afternoon) was not really good light to shoot with.

Here are some more shots with the Bronica from the trip (all with velvia 100).

Monument Valley

Bronica SQ + 80mm Zenzanon f2.8 + Kodak Ektar (Utah, 2013)

There was a forest fire nearby providing the mist on the evening I arrived. At first I was disappointed that I wouldn’t be able to get any good shots, but actually it produced my favourite shot from there. I think it makes the landscape mysterious.

Milan Skyline

Olympus 35RD + Film Forgotten (Milan, 2012)

Turbine Hall

Nikon F100 + Tokina 12-24mm + Fuji Neopan 400 pushed to 1600 (London, 2011)

Before my F100 was stolen in Belize, I managed to put a few rolls through it. The lens used for this photo is actually for DX digital, but works on film somewhere past the 20mm mark. This shot is the turbine hall of the Tate Modern, and the exhibition here was Ai Weiwei’s sunflower seeds.

Zeiss Ikon Nettar 517

Summary

Zeiss Ikon, a German camera legend, operated between 1926 and 1972.  Among others, they produced a vast array of folding camera models, many of which can be picked up on places like eBay for next to nothing, whilst some are very collectable still fetching (relatively) premium prices. The Nettar line was the lower tier of cameras produced by Zeiss Ikon, whilst the Ikonta were the premium line. This specific model, the 517, was produced in 1949 has a Novar Anastigmat 75mm f6.3  lens and a Vario Leaf shutter (with Bulb, 1/25, 1/75 and 1/200 speeds). It takes 6×6 photos on normal paper backed 120 film, and there is a little window on the back to show the frame number to help you with winding it on correctly. There is no double exposure prevention mechanism, which may be a useful or annoying thing depending on how consistent you are at winding on the film after a shot.

The pros for this camera: it is so light and small that it can fit in a large pocket. Its also so inexpensive that there is no reason that if you have any desire to try one out, you should just go ahead and buy one. The lens is also surprisingly sharp, when you get it in focus.

The negatives would be the limited shutter speeds and slow aperture on this model, meaning fast film, lots of sunlight or tripod mounting is generally the way to go. 

My Story with this Camera

This camera was given to me by my Great Grandma, who came by it in a roundabout way. It looks barely used and is in fantastic condition. The bellows look pristine, which is the first thing you should check when buying one of these. This was my first medium format camera, and to be honest I was pleasantly surprised after the first roll that I got any photos I liked at all. Its a camera thats easy to make mistakes with, either by misjudging exposure, not paying close enough attention to the focus scale or forgetting if you’ve wound it on. In fact when I first used the camera I mainly used it to try double exposures, however now looking back many of those have lost their novelty.

Medium Format film is great and this camera was my first exposure to it. However I did start getting frustrated with the number of wasted shots I made with it, and finally got a Bronica SLR which led to me using this much less. In the future I’m going to revisit this camera, particularly when I want to take an MF camera but can’t deal with the bulk of the Bronica.

Photos

Conclusion

This camera can be a great inexpensive way to experience medium format film photography. It can also be really fun for double exposures, if thats your thing. However its easy to misjudge the focus and exposure, so its worth slowing down when using it. I doubt I’ll ever sell it; I find it remarkable that a camera 68 years old can still produce great images!

Snake Charmer

Cosina CT1A + Cosinon 50mm + Ilford HP5 Plus (Marrakesh, 2011)

Iguazu Falls Close Up

Nikon F3 + Nikon 50mm f1.8 Series E + Fuji Velvia 100 (Brazil, 2012)

Ah yes, the purple tones of underexposed velvia…

Grand Canyon

Bronica SQA + Zenznon 80mm f2.8 + Kodak Ektar 100 (Arizona, 2013)

Cambridge Processing

Nikon F3 + Nikon 50mm f.18 Series E + Kodak Ekatr 100 (Cambridge MA, 2017)

This was taken with my F3 hooked up with a waist level finder. I’d wanted to get one for a while because I really like the ergonomics of taking photos with one, and finally got one early this year. Even though the focussing screen is really small for 35mm cameras compared to a medium format SLR, I still find it a very engaging way to take photos. I’ve also not had too big of a problem focusing with it either. And as a final bonus it shaves a noticeable amount of weight from the camera, as opposed to using the normal finder!

Looking out on NYC Harbour

Nikon F3 + Nikon 50mm f1.8 Series E + Kodak Ektar 100 (NYC, 2012)

Fog in Frisco

Bronica SQA + Zenzanon 50mm PS + Kodak Tmax 100 (San Francisco, 2013)

Budapest Castle

Bronica SQA + Zenzanon 80mm f2.8 + Ilford HP5 Plus (Budapest, 2012)

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